ENGINEERS. CRAFTSMEN. ARTISTS.

 

 

 

 

1
Necessary and Useful
2
GPJ’s Success With One Young World
3
A Little Gratitude With the Sarcasm, Please
4
Accessibility and Affluence (Like Oil and Water): How Consumers Are Finding a Way to Fix the Two
5
Why Men Need To Take All The Paternity Leave Their Company Allows
6
The Upside of Thinking Different: Asperger’s, ADHD and enhanced creativity
7
My Month on Madison Ave
8
Getting Millennials Fit for the Future – the IBM Cognitive Smoothie Experience
9
Labor Day Career Tip: Be a sponge
10
Being a Woman is Not Newsworthy

Necessary and Useful

School CEO Max Lenderman on why purpose-led marketing is the way of the future
via School

via School

How would you define purpose-led marketing, and why is it important? 

Purpose-led marketing is an emerging school of thought built on the idea that creatively commercial activities should try to make the world a better place. I often remind myself of a quote I read from Design House Stockholm: “Don’t make something unless it is both necessary and useful. But if it is necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful.” We, as the advertising and marketing industry, have been relatively fixated on the “beautiful” part. Purpose-led marketing tries to concentrate on necessity and utility.

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GPJ’s Success With One Young World

GPJ UK won ‘International Conference of the Year’ at the C&IT 2016 awards for their work on One Young World Summit 2015
GPJ UK Team

GPJ UK Team

 

At the 2016 C&IT Awards, George P. Johnson’s UK team came away with a big win. Their work on the 2015 One Young World Summit in Bangkok earned them the ‘International Conference of the Year’ award, and it’s a win well-deserved.

One Young World (OYW) is a UK-based non-profit that organizes events for young leaders to gather together and brainstorm solutions to the world’s greatest challenges. Its annual summit took place in Bangkok in 2015 and saw young leaders from 196 countries come together in the presence of global luminaries such as Sir Bob Geldolf and Kofi Annan, to voice their opinions and debate the future of their world.

GPJ partnered with One Young World to bring the summit to great new heights.

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A Little Gratitude With the Sarcasm, Please

It’s as necessary as sustenance, but our industry too easily confuses it with satisfaction, writes the CEO of School
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via Pixabay

Thank you. We say it all the time. It’s what we are taught to do for deeds big and small. For every good thing that comes our way. For the food on our table, and the loved ones in our hearts.

I’ve been told that gratitude is the expressed emotion that keeps us grounded, makes us humble, and keeps us young. In life, gratitude is as necessary as sustenance. But in our industry, it’s easy to confuse satisfaction with gratitude.

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Accessibility and Affluence (Like Oil and Water): How Consumers Are Finding a Way to Fix the Two

via Flickr/Michael Mandiberg

via Flickr/Michael Mandiberg

Just look at this month’s New York Fashion Week. Or actually, let’s throw it back to the 1850’s when top couture houses in France held private fashion shows for their most prized clients. The high-end fashion world has always been good at making sure no one outside of their exclusive circle has access to their products. Talk about defining affluence.

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Why Men Need To Take All The Paternity Leave Their Company Allows

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The following was written for The Fatherly Forum, a community of parents and influencers with insights about work, family, and life. If you’d like to join the Forum, drop us a line at TheForum@Fatherly.com.
“Clean your plate.”
“Why?”
“Because there are starving kids in Africa.”This was routine dialogue in my house growing up. My mom, in classic Catholic guilt fashion, thought that my brothers and I needed to finish our meals because other people in the world weren’t as fortunate. It wasn’t like the food I didn’t eat could get put in a Fed Ex box and ship it half-way across the world. It took till I reach adulthood to recognize the flawed nature in her attempt at persuasion. Funny enough, I cannot help but think of this as I begin my return back from a company approved month long paternity leave.

I struggled with accepting a full month off. It is a new policy and I am the first in my office to take advantage of it. It didn’t help that my daughter’s due date coincided with a large event we were producing. I couldn’t stop feeling like I was leaving my colleagues in the lurch. My team was unconditionally supportive however; kicking me off of email chains, redirecting client attention their way and letting me have a truly focused window of time with my family.

Flickr / Drew and Merissa

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The Upside of Thinking Different: Asperger’s, ADHD and enhanced creativity

Research has long shown a link between certain neurological conditions and artistic skills, which comes as no surprise to some creative directors

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James Hilton’s childhood was marked by a series of obsessions. Astronomy. Genetics. Typography. Classic horror books. “I would read Bram Stoker’s Draculaand, as soon as I finished it, start it again and again and again,” he says. “My parents bought me quite a few VHS copies of Star Wars because I kept wearing the tapes out.”

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My Month on Madison Ave

Observations of the advertising industry from a Project intern
Photo via Kullez/Flickr

Photo via Kullez/Flickr

It is impossible to go a day without being immersed in some form advertising. Even with DVR capabilities and ad-blocking software, ads find a way. I’ll scroll through my Snapchat to see what my friends are doing, and before I even realize the sponsored tag in the corner, I am actively taking in branded content, delivered in a way that feels like I’m just watching my friends’ stories.

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Getting Millennials Fit for the Future – the IBM Cognitive Smoothie Experience

Nina Barchukova, GPJ campaign project manager and marketing strategist, writes about positioning IBM as a relevant brand for millennials

 

IBM Cognitive Smoothie Experience crew at Glamour Health Challenge

IBM Cognitive Smoothie Experience crew at Glamour Health Challenge

 

The Glamour Health Challenge in Amsterdam is a sports event of a special kind. It features the latest trends in fashion, fitness and lifestyle – and young women from all over the country are invited to join in. Organized by Glamour, the biggest fashion magazine in the Netherlands, the event took place on June 11, 2016. 800 attendees enjoyed one day full of ballet and boot camp sessions, fashion shows and dancing. The Dutch IBM team handed out 300 refreshing cognitive smoothies to exhausted sportswomen, as a cool, relevant way to tell the IBM story.  This initiative directly addressed a priority gap identified in the Benelux Brand Plan, “millennials don’t know IBM”.

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Labor Day Career Tip: Be a sponge

Soft skills can yield hard results if you play your cards right, says Pitch strategist Lexi Whelan
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It’s September, and the projected two million college graduates in the U.S. are enjoying the best job market in years. Great news as we approach Labor Day, a day dubbed “a day of the people,” a day to celebrate the contributions workers have made year after year. Companies have welcomed this new young talent into the work force with open arms, hiring about 5% more graduates from the class of 2016 than last year. But most of these new employees probably feel like they have no idea what they’re doing. Many of us, myself included, can sympathize with the anxiety that comes with being a newbie.

When I landed my first job in advertising at Pitch in 2014 as a junior strategist, I had absolutely no clue what I was doing. We’re often driven to believe that you’re hired and will be prepared because of your “hard skills.” I was hired because of my strongest “soft skill,” my sponginess.

The woman who hired me is extremely intelligent, so I was filled with equal parts joy and shock when she hired me. After all, I had no industry experience and a degree in psychology and anthropology which aren’t exactly direct routes to advertising. I’d like to think I wowed her with my unique internships and quick wit, but I know she ultimately gave me the opportunity because I was genuinely eager to learn. Two years into my job where I am now a strategist, I can attest that this quality is more relevant and important than ever. In a recent 2016 CareerBuilder study, the top attribute hiring managers looked for in college recruits was “learning agility”— the ability to learn from experiences and apply those learnings going forward.

When I first started in my junior role, I knew I had to deliver on being a super sponge. I set out to be the most porous new hire the agency had ever seen, to soak up every experience and drink up every learning opportunity I could. I firmly believed that if I could learn by osmosis, eventually I would deliver.

I was right.

The things I learned in the first few months on the job have repeatedly proven invaluable. Now that I select and train new hires, I’m realizing that you can’t teach the all-important soft skills, like enthusiasm and willingness to learn. But people who possess those key qualities can easily be taught and conquer the “hard skills.

So, as we get ready to celebrate the 122nd Labor Day, here are my top five tips on how to be a sponge.

Check Your Ego
In an entry-level position this is especially important. It can be counter intuitive to come to work and be vulnerable. But the power of vulnerability means that you don’t have to pretend. You shouldn’t “fake it till you make it” in this situation! You are new. No one expects you to know everything right out the gate, so don’t act like you do. Appreciate the fact that you are there to learn, to work hard, and to grow. Accept that at first you may feel confused and in over your head. It’s okay. Even the CEOs of all Fortune 500 companies once had their very first jobs and felt the same way.

Ask Questions, but Package Them
If you don’t understand something, ask. Asking questions is not a sign of weakness, it is a sign of strength. But you should fight the urge to go directly to your manager for all your questions (even though they’ll tell you that you can). Challenge yourself to find the answers on your own. Abide by the “can I Google this” test. Ask your peers for help on general office basics. Go to your manager prepared with questions you’ve already put through the ringer and truly need their help with. This shows you respect their time, their knowledge, and expertise by asking them about topics they’re trained to teach you and you’re interested in learning.

Read What They’re Reading
Find out what your manager is reading. Find out what your company executives and clients are reading. You can do this in a fairly unobtrusive way. (Hint: check out their bookshelves). Ask for book recommendations. Challenge yourself to read what people who are more experienced than you are reading. It may be tough. You may get sleepy. But you will gain an elevated knowledge base. It could also help spark an interesting conversation with people more senior than you by providing some key talking points.

Embrace Your Fresh Perspective
You were hired for a reason. As a fresh mind and new generation, you should absolutely volunteer original thinking. Come to meetings with suggestions, and speak up if it’s appropriate. You will have ideas that may seem crazy or surprising. Appreciate that you may be wrong at times, but continue to bring those ideas. The best leaders know that great thinking can come from anywhere, especially employees who bring a new perspective.

Be an Active Sponge
Seek out opportunities of all kinds. Offer to take notes in a meeting (be sure they are detailed and organized). Ask if you can sit in on calls to simply listen. Join local groups that are relevant to your industry. Participate in free trainings or webinars that are interesting and will give you an edge. Pick up a new skill outside your existing arsenal, especially if that something is currently difficult for you. If you have free time, ask others if you can help them. It’s not only about the hours you put in but the value you add. People will notice and want you on their team for future projects.

Good luck. And, don’t worry. You’ll be great.

This post originally appeared on Campaign. Read it here.

Being a Woman is Not Newsworthy

 

Via startupstockphotos.com

Via startupstockphotos.com

Earlier this year, the Peterson Institute for International Economics reported on its study of 22,000 companies around the world. The big takeaway: there is a correlation between a higher number of women in executive leadership positions and an increase in company profitability.

This finding triggered an avalanche of articles in publications like The New York TimesHarvard Business ReviewThe Wall Street JournalBloombergThe Financial Times, and Fortune, with headlines like “New proof that more female bosses equal higher profits.”

The more I thought about the rapid sharing of these headlines, the less I liked it.

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